The One Contract Your Practice Must Have

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Buy-Sell Agreement

The One Contract Your Practice Must Have
Though the odds of a premature death of a practice partner are not high, the same cannot be said about a life changing disability. Because both of these risks can have such devastating effects on the finances of the practice and the future income of the remaining healthy partners, we find it troubling that so few Doctors properly address this risk.
A medical practice is a business. As such, it is created for the purpose of generating financial benefit for its owners. Practice CEOs are supposed to take calculated risks and manage these risks to maximize long-term after-tax income. There is no excuse for them to completely ignore the potentially devastating risk of disability or death of physician-partners. Are you the de facto CEO of your practice? If so, how are you protecting against these risks?
Most states prevent non-Doctors from owning professional medical practices. This is certainly true in California. California Business and Professions Code Section 2052 provides that “any person who practices or attempts to practice, or who advertises or holds himself or herself out as practicing… [medicine] without having at the time of so doing a valid, unrevoked, or unsuspended certificate…is guilty of a public offense, punishable by a fine, by imprisonment in the state prison, by imprisonment in a county jail not exceeding one year, or by both the fine and either imprisonment.”
Additionally, California Business and Professions Code Section 2400 provides that “corporations and other artificial legal entities shall have no professional rights, privileges, or powers.” The policy expressed in Business and Professions Code section 2400 against the corporate practice of medicine is intended to prevent unlicensed persons from interfering with, or influencing, the physician’s professional judgment.
This means that, as compared to a regular business owner, a Doctor building a medical practice is not generally building wealth for his or her family. If you want to ensure that you do build wealth for the family through your practice and actually turn your practice into a “wealth building engine” for your family, you must draft, fully-execute, and fund a Buy-Sell agreement.
In this chapter, we will discuss the reasons why a premature death or disability of a partner is such a big risk and what the financial repercussions are of failing to address this issue. We will then discuss the “medicine” for such an ailment—the Buy-Sell Agreement. We also address the importance, and method, of funding the agreement and how to work with the right team of advisors. With all of this knowledge, you should be motivated and prepared to address this important issue in your practice.

Always Expect The Unexpected
As owners of a professional practice, Doctors can spend 10 hours per day, six or seven days per week getting their practices to the point where the practice provides a measure of security for their families. We know, because we have been there ourselves. Nonetheless, those who ignore one fundamental legal contract jeopardize all of their hard work. This very important legal contract is the Buy-Sell agreement. This is an agreement that all owners sign, agreeing how the practice will be valued at the time of one partner’s death or disability, and how the purchase of the shares will be paid.
Without a Buy-Sell agreement, partners and remaining families have no guidelines as to how a practice will deal with an early death or the disability of a physician-owner. At a time when the family is grieving or caring for a disabled family member and possibly struggling to pay their bills, they will look to the remaining partners’ practice to help them in their time of need. At the same time, the remaining partners may be struggling to get by without the services of a valuable partner. The last thing either of these two groups need is a struggle over money. In too many cases, the absence of a Buy-Sell agreement at the time of death or disability can cause bankruptcies for the families of all of the partners. More