Paying Bills Even If You Can’t Work

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Paying Bills Even If You Can't Work

Paying Bills Even If You Can’t Work
If you are like most of our other clients with high incomes, the single greatest asset your family has is your earning power. This reality motivates most people to buy life insurance as protection against a premature death. For most people, purchasing life insurance is “common sense.” While most people with whom we speak are underinsured, they do have at least some protection against a premature death. However, most Average American professionals, entrepreneurs, business owners, and executives often overlook a more dangerous threat to their long-term financial stability—their own disability. What is the risk that the average individual will suffer a disability? According to marketing materials of more than one life insurance company:
“Probability of at least one long-term disability (90 days or longer) occurring before age 65 is: 50% for someone age 25; 45% for someone age 35; 38% for someone age 45; and 26% for someone age 55.”
Inadequate disability income insurance coverage can be more costly than death, divorce, or a lawsuit. Responsible financial planning includes planning for the best possible future while protecting against the worst possible events. No one ever plans on becoming disabled—though half of those aged 25 will have a disability of three months or longer at least once. This chapter explains not only why you need disability insurance, but also what to look for in a disability policy.

The Need For Disability Insurance
In our opinion, the disability of the family breadwinner can be more financially devastating to a family than premature death. In both cases, the breadwinner will be unable to provide any income for the family; however, in the case of death, the deceased earner is no longer an expense to the family. Yet, if the breadwinner suddenly becomes disabled, he or she still needs to be fed, clothed, and cared for by medical professionals or family members. In many cases, the medical care alone can cost hundreds of dollars per day. Thus, with a disability, income is reduced or eliminated and expenses increase. This can be a devastating turn of events and can lead to creditor problems and even bankruptcy.
If you are older (near retirement) and have saved a large enough sum of money to immediately fund a comfortable retirement, then you probably don’t need disability income protection. Of course, you may have some long-term care concerns, but that is covered in the next chapter. On the other hand, if you are under 50 years old, or if you are older than 50 and have several pre-college age children, you should consider the right disability insurance a necessity. The challenge is determining what type of disability income policy is “right” for you.

Employer Provided Coverage Often Inadequate
If you are an employee of a university, HMO, or other large corporation, your employer may provide long-term disability coverage. The premiums are probably discounted from what you would pay for a private policy. We advise you take a good look at what the employer-offered policy covers, and buy a private policy if you and the insurance professional on your advisory team decide you need it. For many people, this makes a lot of sense because employer-provided group policies are often inadequate. They may limit either the term of the coverage or the amount of benefits paid. For instance, benefits may last only a few years or benefit payments may represent only a small part of your annual compensation. Since this is most commonly an employer-paid benefit, the money received during your disability will be income taxable to you. For most, this arrangement would result in your taking home less than half of the original amount in your paycheck after taxes are paid!

Give Yourself a Check-Up
Most people with employer-provided disability insurance coverage will find the benefits inadequate. To help you determine where your existing coverage may be lacking, we have provided some questions for you to ask when you are giving yourself an insurance check-up. When you are ultimately working with the insurance professional on your advisory team, you should keep some of these questions in mind as well. They will help you better compare coverage options from different companies so that you can find the best policy for your specific circumstances and goals. Below are a list of some questions you should ask yourself as well as short explanations of the appropriate answers:
· How long does the disability coverage last?
· How much is the benefit? (Some plans may cap the benefits at $5,000 per month)
· What percentage of your income is covered? (Generally, you cannot receive more than 60% of income and the benefit is capped at $7,500 or $10,000, depending on your age). Though most group LTD plans are good for the purpose that they serve, they are only a partial cure. Because of the limitations or ‘cap,’ they have a built—in discrimination against higher income employees—like you!
· Who pays the premiums? (TIP: If you pay the premiums yourself, and not as a deductible expense through your business or practice, your benefits will be tax-free.) You may be seduced by the income tax deduction of the premiums, but the extra tax burden today is much easier to swallow than the tax burden will be if you suffer a disability and have a significantly reduced income and increased expenses. When you and your family need the money the most, you will have more.
· Is the policy portable, or convertible, to an individual policy if you leave the group? If so, do you maintain your reduced group rate?
· If your business distributes all earnings from the corporation at year-end in the way of bonuses to all owners/partners (typical of C-corps as a way to avoid double taxation), you should see whether these amounts are covered by the group policy. If not, and if bonuses or commissions make up a substantial part of your income (which we have seen to be the case with many people), you’ll More

First, Do No Harm

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Protecting Assets

One common financial disaster that can result in a significant loss of assets is a civil lawsuit. Lessons #5 and #6 will offer almost two dozen specific solutions to help mitigate litigation risks. Though malpractice lawsuits are a significant risk for physicians in today’s society, they do not pose the most significant risk to one’s wealth if proper insurance is in place.
This Lesson will explore those additional—and more devastating—financial disasters that must be addressed if you wish to achieve and maintain wealth. These risks include both health-related and financial events. More specifically, this section of the book will teach you how to:
· Protect your family from an unexpected death
· Keep paying your bills even if you can’t work due to disability
· Handle long-term care expenses before they arise
· Make sure you don’t run out of money in retirement
· Avoid healthcare and insurance threats
· Avoid employment threats
· Obtain insurance to protect against business and personal risks

post 7Protecting Your Family From an Unexpected Death
The emotional distress caused by the premature death of a loved one cannot be exaggerated. Long before the psychological scars begin to heal, financial devastation for surviving family members may begin. If proper planning is not undertaken, the value of the medical practice, which could be a saleable asset to help the family, may be lost.
There are various obstacles to successful financial planning in the case of unforeseen death simply because none of us knows when our time will come. The 2003 National Safety Council’s study on deaths (http://www.nsc.org/lrs/statinfo/odds.htm) and the 1999 US Census Bureau’s Statistical Abstract of the United States, which surveyed the year 1997, reported the following statistics in regard to unforeseen death types:
· There is a 1 in 24 chance (4.17%) that you will ultimately die from a stroke
· There is a 4% chance you will die from an accident or the adverse effects of one
When you add these two risks together, you can see that approximately 1 in 12 people will die from an unforeseen risk. In addition, a number of people will find out they are terminally ill and their families will not be able to purchase personal life insurance to help them manage the financial burden created when they pass away.
Another obstacle to successful financial planning in the case of unforeseen death is that most people don’t enjoy contemplating, let alone discussing, the death of a family member. As a result, few families are financially or emotionally prepared for this traumatic event.
In this chapter, we will discuss two financial losses that can occur at the time of death:
· Loss of income
· Loss of an estate (via estate taxes and probate costs)
Physicians and their families can use particular insurance planning strategies to efficiently manage the risks which often result from the premature death of a family member. In addition, proper legal documentation must be created to allow for efficient handling of financial matters at death—including offering the executor of the estate the legal power to effectuate a transfer prior to the estate going through probate. If there are unnecessary delays in this process, the patients will seek another practitioner, thus diminishing the value of the practice further. This chapter aims to teach you how to protect wealth from the death of a patriarch or matriarch. Let’s explore how this can be done.

Income Protection
A key to successful planning is an ability to put one’s fear of death aside and focus on the financial impact a death may have on a family. The first financial impact of death, especially for younger families, is the lost income. Once a father or mother has passed away, they obviously will not earn any more income. If the family hasn’t met all of its saving goals (most don’t until they are well into their fifties), there will be a significant financial strain from the death. The key to maintaining wealth is making sure that no financial catastrophe wipes out the family. To show you how significant this loss of income can be, consider the following.
The present value of twenty years of lost income for the Average American family (with $45,000 of annual income) is approximately $636,000. That means that, at the time of death, the family would be in the same financial situation if they had 20 years of income OR had a lump sum of $636,000.
For the family of a physician who earns $300,000 per year, the present value of twenty years of lost income is over $4,200,000. For the family of a very successful specialist who earns $1,000,000 per year, the present value of 20 years of lost income is $14 million. The simple estimate implies that a family needs approximately 14 times the annual income of the breadwinner to replace twenty years of lost income. If you have a younger breadwinner or a breadwinner who just intends to work 30 more years, the multiple used to approximate the present value of future income is 18 times one year’s income.
What these examples illustrate is that a family needs life insurance in the amount of at least 14 times the annual income of each wage earner just to keep them on track to meet their financial goals (assuming that their current earnings were keeping them on track before the death). Also, this estimate assumes no adjustment for inflation. Over twenty to twenty five years, the value of a dollar is reduced by 50%. For that reason, you could estimate that a family needs between 14 and 28 times one year’s after-tax salary to replace twenty years of income. Do you have enough life insurance to protect your family and leave them in a position to meet their goals if you were to die?
In addition to lost income, the practice asset will be lost if proper estate planning doesn’t establish a trustee with a power of sale. This is the best possible option since More